20 Nov 2017

The Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children and Young People joins forces with the Council for the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA) to launch new children’s rights resource hub for teachers and pupils.

Commenting at the launch of the animation and accompanying teaching resources, the Children’s Commissioner Koulla Yiasouma said:

“Nearly 30 years ago today the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) was adopted, so it is very fitting that we are launching these important resources as part of this anniversary celebration.

“One of NICCY’s key duties is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of the UNCRC, and child rights education is an important aspect of this. I was pleased to partner with CCEA to develop this suite of resources, which will help teachers and others to tell more young people about their rights.”   

In June 2016 the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child published its 'Concluding Observations'. One of its recommendations was that children’s rights education should become a mandatory part of the curriculum.

CCEA Chief Executive Justin Edwards said:

“Human rights, including children’s rights, are integral to the Northern Ireland Curriculum.   All young people are encouraged, throughout all areas of the curriculum, to respect themselves, to understand their rights and to respect the equal rights of others.  This is particularly embedded within the area of Personal Development and Mutual Understanding at primary and through Citizenship at post-primary.

“We were delighted to collaborate in this valuable new resource, produced in partnership with NICCY and in particular with the NICCY Youth Panel, which provides access to a range of activities helping to educate our young people about their rights.”

The new animation which brings rights to life for children in Northern Ireland, was created with the help of the NICCY Youth Panel.

Roma, a member of the Panel said:   

"I think it's so important for children and young people in NI to be educated on their rights, they are something that we all have and are all entitled to, yet we know so little about.

“As a member of the Youth Panel over the past few years, I've tried to get involved in as many activities as possible to help educate other children and young people on their rights."

Concluding, the Commissioner said:

“Although these resources are not mandatory, they will provide opportunities for children and young people to learn about their rights, to learn through rights, and to learn about their potential impact to affect change in society, and the wider world.”

ENDS
Notes to Editors